Month: September 2011

Caravaggio and his works

On September 29, 1571, one of the most famous Italian artists, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio was born in Milan. “Arrogant, rebellious and a murderer, Caravaggio’s short and tempestuous life matched the drama of his works. Characterised by their dramatic, almost theatrical lighting, Caravaggio’s paintings were controversial, popular, and hugely influential on succeeding generations of painters […]

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Discovery of penicillin

On September 28, 1928, Sir Alexander Fleming noticed a bacteria-killing mold growing in his laboratory. This was a discovery that changed the course of history. Fleming said, “I did not invent penicillin. Nature did that. I only discovered it by accident.” Indeed, he was not the first one to use penicillin properties, but he was […]

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Einstein’s theory of relativity

Published on 27 September 1905, Einstein’s article “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” introduced the equation E= mc² and laid the foundation of modern physics. From an early age, Albert Einstein had shown great interest and talent for science and mathematics. By the age of 30, he was already recognised as one of the leading […]

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Our first interactive video launched today

Today we launched our first interactive video – Europeana Remix.  Based on a short film that was produced as a result of a crowdsourcing project “The First World War in everyday documents“, the video now turns into a new enriching experience. Empowered with latest video technology and resources from Europeana and the web, the interactive […]

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Highlights from Hack4Europe! Roadshow

Four amazing events in four great cities! See the highlights from the Hack4Europe! roadshow in June 2011. Enjoy the excitement, fun and cool apps. Hack4Europe! Road Show, 7-11 June 2011 from europeana on Vimeo.

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Dead Sea Scrolls

Exactly 20 years ago, the oldest biblical manuscripts – the Dead Sea Scrolls – were made available to the public for the first time by the Huntington Library in the U.S. Their importance, both religious and historical, is immense. As Prof. Fagan and Prof. Beck explain in The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, the Dead Sea […]

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Oktoberfest begins in Munich

The most famous beer festival, Oktoberfest, has kicked off last Saturday in Munich, Germany. The Munich Oktoberfest is one of the most popular events in Germany with six million people from around the world attending it every year. This year the Munich Oktoberfest marks its 201st anniversary. This is a great occasion to: try beer […]

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Sketches from the First World War

Text by Dr. Stephen Bull* This small pencil sketch on a field postcard was sent by Hans Gaigl, a soldier with the Bayrischen Landwehr Fußartillerie Batallion Nr. 2, 6. Batterie, to his wife Marie in Munich in November 1917. It is just one of a number of such cards contributed to the online collection by […]

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Illustrations by Arthur Rackham

The great English book illustrator Arthur Rackham was born on 19 September 1867 in London. Rackham was a member of The Royal Watercolour Society   and the Société Nationale des Beaux Arts, and Master of the Art Workers’ Guild.  His works were awarded gold medals at the Milan International Exhibition (1906) and the Barcelona International Exhibition […]

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Darwin’s theory of natural selection

On September 15, 1835, the ship HMS Beagle with the young naturalist Charles Darwin on board reached the Galapagos Islands. For over five weeks Darwin made observations on the geology and biology of the four islands, leading to major scientific discoveries, including the explanation of how volcanic tuff is formed. Darwin’s observations of birds that […]

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Francisco de Quevedo

On 14 September 1580, the renowned Spanish writer of the Baroque era Francisco Gómez de Quevedo y Santibáñez Villegas was born in Madrid. His style of combining simple vocabulary and brilliant wit can be seen in all of his works that range from poetry to theological works and satire. Some of his most renowned works […]

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Michelangelo’s statue of David

The work on one of the finest examples of Renaissance art, the statue of David, began in Florence 510 years ago. Although Michelangelo was only 26 years old then, it was decided to commission the creation of the Biblical figure to him. Michelangelo had already demonstrated his skills in the renowned Tondo Doni, but the […]

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Robert Schumann and his love

On 12 September 1840, after six long years of waiting, one of the greatest composers Robert Schumann could finally marry the love of his life, pianist Clara Wieck. Clara was a daughter of Schumann’s music teacher, Friedrich Wieck. Schumann fell in love with this beautiful and talented girl, even though he was already engaged to […]

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Wiki Loves Monuments Launch: Rules & Prizes

Wiki Loves Monuments,  the photograph competition organized by Wikimedia, has been launched!  The contest, which is on for this September, aims to produce a good amount of freely licensed pictures of European monuments which can then be re-used not only in Wikipedia but everywhere by everyone. Rules Every submission should be: Self taken and self uploaded […]

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