Month: January 2012

Franz Schubert

“When I wished to sing of love, it turned to sorrow. And when I wished to sing of sorrow, it was transformed for me into love.” Franz Schubert Born on 31 January 1797 in Vienna, Franz Schubert is considered one of the greatest composers and is one of the most frequently played composers today. His […]

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

One of the most popular classical composers, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg on 27 January 1756. From an early age, Mozart showed great interest and extraordinary talent in music. Already at five, he started composing his first pieces, and impressed European royalty with his masterful keyboard play. His father, Leopold, a musician and […]

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Winner Update & Virtual Exhibition in Russian

Photo: Csaba Attila Kontar, winner in the Art Nouveau category of the Wiki Loves Monuments photo contest – with his prizes from Europeana . You can view the winning image in the Wiki Loves Art Nouveau virtual exhibition. Wiki Loves Art Nouveau launched in December of last year as our first crowd-sourced virtual exhibition, featuring 50 […]

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The scandalous art of Edouard Manet

“There are no lines in nature, only areas of colour, one against another.” Edouard Manet One of the most influential artists of the 19th century Edouard Manet was born on 23 January 1883 to a wealthy Parisian family with strong political connections. His father was a judge, and his mother was a daughter of a diplomat and […]

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Robert Falcon Scott’s South Pole expedition

One hundred years ago, on 17 January 1912, the Terra Nova Expedition, officially known as the British Antarctic Expedition 1910, led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott reached the South Pole. Unfortunately, the crew made it only to discover they were beaten by their Norwegian rival, Roald Amundsen, by 34 days and to meet their desolate […]

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Video: Europeana 2011 Highlights

As we settle into 2012 and look ahead to the coming year, we would like you to take a moment and look back at 2011 with our short annual highlights video. 2011 was a busy year for Europeana filled with many new and exciting achievements, unfortunately it is impossible to include them all in this […]

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Charles Perrault’s fairy tales

Charles Perrault is a name that is familiar to the young and old all over the world.  Who doesn’t know his Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty? Perrault was born on 12 January 1628 to a wealthy Parisian family. After studying law, he pursued a career in government service. When the Académie des […]

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A biography of Barbara Hepworth

Today we are celebrating the 109th birthday of the leading British contemporary artist – Barbara Hepworth. Born in Wakefield, Yorkshire, Hepworth attended the Leeds School of Art and studied sculpture at the Royal College of Art. After winning a West Riding Scholarship for one year’s travel abroad, she spent it in Italy where she spent […]

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Did Columbus really see mermaids?

On 9 January 1493, Christopher Columbus observed something he had before seen on the coasts of Africa… Mermaids.  In his journal he described the encounter with three mermaids that elevated themselves above the suface of the sea. Most likely mistaking manatees, aquatic mammals also known as sea cows, for mermaids, “Columbus, disposed to give a […]

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Understanding Pessoa through his library

Contributed by our Prod­uct Devel­oper David Haskiya: I’ve recently discovered a collection in Europeana that quickly has become one of my favourites: the digitised library of the Portuguese author Fernando Pessoa. Checking out his library gives me that same feeling I get when I visit someone’s house or apartment and study their bookshelves in an attempt […]

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Isaac Newton

“Nature and Nature’s Laws lay hid in Night: GOD said, Let Newton be! and all was Light.” (Alexander Pope, 1797) Isaac Newton (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727, Gregorian calendar) is considered to be one of the greatest and most influential scientists in history. His immense contribution to science had made him the “gold standard” […]

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