New Feature: Cite on Wikipedia

Hot on the heels of last week’s launch of the map search and display, we have added another new feature to the Europeana portal – ‘Cite on Wikipedia’. Thanks to this update, it is now easier for Wikipedia editors to reference and link to Europeana items from Wikipedia articles.  When you use this new feature, your citation includes the title of the work, the creator, attribution to Europeana and a link to the item on the portal. We are always looking for new ways to enrich content inside and outside of Europeana and this functionality is a big step forward. We hope this new feature will assist Wikipedians with their citations and open up a large external resource for them to easily reference.

New Feature: Cite on Wikipedia

On all Europeana item pages you will now see ‘Cite on Wikipedia’ on the right, below the translation tool. When clicked, an overlay window will appear with a code snippet formatted in wiki-markup for direct inclusion in articles. For many items, content providers include the birth and death dates of the creator, although this can be easily removed by the editor before publishing.

If you are a Wikipedian it would be great to hear what you think of this new feature.

Related Posts

10 thoughts on “New Feature: Cite on Wikipedia

  1. Hi Neil,

    as active Wikipedia contributor I think this is so great. First: on a practical level. Citations and refrenrences in Wikipedia are actually a mess, and I spend way too much time to get citation code right, instead of actually contributing contents to Wikipedia. So a help like this is greatly appreciated.

    Second: as a symbol. This tool by Europeana shows appreciation of Wikipedia and the work done there. It will help in convincing other institutions that Wikipedia can actually help them, and is a project worth contributing to.

  2. Hi Dirk, thanks for your comment. It’s great that you find this new feature practical and I’m excited to hear that you will be actively using it.

  3. Hi Peter,
    Would it just be a matter of adding the tags in our output at the start and end? If so, yeah we can add that as an optional output.

    And then the editor would create the actual footnote list himself/herself?

    Regards,
    David Haskiya (Product Develeper at Europeana)

  4. Hi David,

    first of all: the ref tag did not display correctly in my last post; you can see on the Help:Footnotes link I’ve attached
    .
    Yes indeed, adding the tags to the start and end is all which needs to be done. The footnote list is created automatically in the References”section of an article. A template called “{{Reflist}}” is placed in this section and “collects” any citation that is using the ref tag. Hence, wrapping the ref tag around your “{{cite web}}” template will assure that citations from “Cite on Wikipedia” are displayed correctly in the References section of an article. If you need any more information, feel free to contact me via mail.

    Regards, Peter Weis

  5. Hi Peter,
    The blog didn’t like the brackets around ref in my comment either! And this was the answer I was looking for.

    Adding to next sprint’s log to offer an optional ref-wrapped output in the Cite on Wikipedia function.

    Cheers,
    David

  6. also from the content providers site, I think this is great! Makes me wonder if there is a standard for citations that applicable wider then bibliographical objects. that would prevent Europeana from having to support different formats for every possible target. Even Wikipedia has already two.

  7. This is a great development — thank you for implementing this and seeking feedback! Peter’s suggestion is a good one, glad to see that is now implemented.

    This prompts some questions for me about your content in general; I wonder if more of the metadata from your site could be incorporated. Specifically:

    * I see that on this artifact, there is a source listed (Etnografiska museet): http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/91619/049F47E9C096BF69DEA2A914377CE8649DE553A6.html I’m not sure what would be the best field to use in the {{cite web}} template, but I think the reader would benefit from immediate access to this information.
    * Is there a way to link directly to the English version (or any specific language version)?
    * When I click “more” (for instance, on the entry linked above), I get text that still ends in an ellipsis (…) — where does the full body of text live?
    * For an artifact like this one, it would be ideal to have the publication date listed both on your site, and in the citation: http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/2020601/A72630B91EFD0328BEBF8FF533B5487411FB039C.html (And, a much smaller detail, listing the author’s name in separate “first” and “last” name fields would be a slight improvement)

    Finally, in case you (or your readers) are unaware, there are other organizations that have created similar citation tools, listed at the link below. I added Europeana to this list, with a link to this blog post:

    http://outreach.wikimedia.org/wiki/GLAM/Model_projects/Adding_a_Wikipedia_citation_template_to_your_database

  8. Hi Pete,
    Great that you like the feature! Hope to see it get used.

    I’ll try to answer your questions as best as I can.

    >I see that on this artifact, there is a source listed (Etnografiska museet): >http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/91619/049F47E9C096BF69DEA>2A914377CE8649DE553A6.html I’m not sure what would be the best >field to use in the {{cite web}} template, but I think the reader would >benefit from immediate access to this information.

    I think the reason I didn’t include this was that given the Cite template I didn’t find a good place to put it. Suggestions? Also, I worry it could be misleading as we link back to Europeana rather than to the source.

    >Is there a way to link directly to the English version (or any specific >language version)?

    No, I’m afraid not. But that’s something we should be able to do so I’ll add such a user story to our backlog!

    >When I click “more” (for instance, on the entry linked above), I get text >that still ends in an ellipsis (…) — where does the full body of text live?

    Since part of the Europeana model is that we’re supposed to lead traffic to the original source we cut off long descriptions. Click-through to the provider’s site (click the View item at… link underneath the preview).

    >For an artifact like this one, it would be ideal to have the publication date >listed both on your site, and in the citation: >http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/2020601/A72630B91EFD0328B>EBF8FF533B5487411FB039C.html (And, a much smaller detail, listing >the author’s name in separate “first” and “last” name fields would be a >slight improvement)

    I think for that particular object we don’t have a date of original publication. It is possible to provide such information to Europeana so I can look into if we could include it in the Cite – template.

    Concerning the names, many of our data providers don’t have their original name date separated like that so we’ve had to settle for the lowest denominator. One of the things we’re trying to improve going forward is to improve the consistency of the data. And in the cases of persons start handling them as authorities with each person having a URI/URL and multiple labels.

    And finally, yes, I stole the idea of a Wikipedia citation from either Trove or Powerhouse Museum. Can’t remember which one now!

    Cheers,
    David

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.