Month: April 2012

Koninginnedag: Queen’s Day in the Netherlands

Today the Dutch celebrate Queen Beatrix. Happy Queen’s Day to the Netherlands! Queen’s Day, or Koninginnedag in Dutch, is a national holiday in the Netherlands, Curacao, Sint Maarten and Aruba. Before Queen’s Day the Dutch celebrated ‘Princess Day’ on August 31st. The first celebration was in 1885, on the fifth anniversary of the then young Princess […]

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Austria: Claudia Schmied

Article by Federal Minister Dr. Claudia Schmied: As a symbol of all the items that are being entered by Austria into Europeana, I would like to present the painting from the collections of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna that raised the number of items in Europeana to 20 million: Caravaggio’s painting “David with the Head […]

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Czech Republic: Alena Hanáková

Arti­cle by Alena Hanáková, Minister of Culture of the Czech Republic: Velislav’s Bible (Velislai biblia picta): Czech “comics” from the mid 14th Century If there is a media that suits the current time best then it is neither a book nor photograph or fine art, perhaps not a film either – but it is most likely […]

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Saint George’s Day: The Day of the Book

Today is the feast day of Saint George, celebrated in several countries, regions and cities of which he is the patron saint, including: England, Catalonia, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Moscow, Valencia, Majorca, Aragon, Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania, and more. The 23rd of April is traditionally accepted as the date of Saint George’s death in AD 303. In Catalonia, […]

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Birthday of Joan Miró

“For me, a picture should be like sparks. It must dazzle like the beauty of a woman or a poem. It must have radiance; it must be like those stones which Pyrenean shepherds use to light their pipes.” – Joan Miró Today, 119 years ago, Joan Miró was born, the internationally acclaimed Catalan painter, sculptor and […]

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Man of Letters: Manuel José Quintana

Manuel José Quintana was a Spanish patriot and neoclassical poet born on April 11th 1772 in Madrid. He is one of the most important names in Spanish Literature during the transition from Enlightenment to Romanticism. Quitana  was at the forefront of liberal ideas in politics and advocated his ideologies through his work until his death in […]

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The Science of Movement: Eadweard Muybridge

British photographer Eadweard Muybridge was born on April 9th 1830 in Kingston upon Thames, later emigrating the United States in the 1850s. Muybridge is renowned for his ground-breaking work in animal locomotion, proving a horse does in fact fly when galloping. He was one of the first photographers to use multiple cameras to capture motion, then […]

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Athens 1896: Rebirth of the Olympic Games

On April 6th 1896, the games of the First Olympiad were officially opened in Athens by King George I, coinciding with Easter Monday and the anniversary of Greece’s independence. As Ancient Greece was the birthplace of the Olympic Games, Athens was perceived to be an appropriate choice to stage the inaugural modern Games. It was […]

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The Forgotten Master: Jean-Honoré Fragonard

Jean-Honoré Fragonard was a French Rococo painter and printmaker, born on April 5th 1732 in Grasse in the south of France. He trained in Paris with Chardin and then later Boucher. Fragonard is considered as one of the all-time masters of French painting, with his unique handling of colour coupled with expressive and confident brush strokes, […]

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The Art of Seduction: Giacomo Casanova

Giacomo Casanova, Venetian adventurer and writer, was born on April 2nd 1725 in the Republic of Venice. During the 18th century for Casanova, as well as other upper class nobles, love and sex tended to be casual and not attached to the serious characteristics of the Romanticism era that followed in the latter part of the 18th […]

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