Nobel Prizes 2012: Chemistry

The winners of the 2012 Nobel prizes are being announced this week. So each day, we’re looking to see what Nobel-related content we have in Europeana.

Today, we congratulate Robert J. Lefkowitz & Brian K. Kobilka on winning the 2012 Nobel Prize for Chemistry ‘for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors’. Follow @NobelPrize_org on Twitter for more info!

Chemistry was the most important science for Alfred Nobel’s own work. He was the inventor of dynamite, which for a while he considered naming ‘Nobel’s Safety Powder’.

Alfred Nobel, courtesy of the National Library of Denmark and Copenhagen and the European Library, CC-BY-NC-ND

Alfred Nobel, courtesy of the National Library of Denmark and Copenhagen, CC-BY-NC-ND.

Europeana’s Nobel Prize Winners Hall of Fame

Prof. Sir Aaron Klug FRS is eminent in the filed of structural biochemistry and won the 1982 Nobel Prize for Chemistry ‘for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes’. Image courtesy of the Wellcome Library, London, CC-BY-NC-ND.

Jean-Marie Lehn,  1987 Nobel Chemistry Prize laureate, seen here lecturing at the Out of the Box seminar at the University of Maribor, Maribor, European Capital of Culture 2012. Lehn won the prize with Donald J. Cram and Charles J. Pedersen ‘for their development and use of molecules with structure-specific interactions of high selectivity’. Image courtesy of Culture.si, CC-BY-ND.

Professor Sir Harold Kroto FRS, recipient of the 1996 Nobel Prize for Chemistry along with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley for their discovery of C60 (Bucky balls) and other Fullerenes. Image courtesy of the Wellcome Library, London, CC-BY-NC-ND.

Portrait of Professor Sir John Walker in his laboratory at Cambridge University. He is Head of the Dunn School of Nutrition in Cambridge and won the 1997 Nobel Prize for Chemistry (along with Paul Boyer and Jens Skou) for his work on the crystallographic analysis of the structure and function of the enzyme, ATP synthase. Image courtesy of the Wellcome Library, London, CC-BY-NC-ND.

Related Posts

3 thoughts on “Nobel Prizes 2012: Chemistry

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.