Nobel Prizes 2012: Physiology and Medicine

Over the next few days, the winners of the 2012 Nobel prizes will be announced. So each day, we’ll be looking to see what Nobel-related content we have in Europeana.

Today the 2012 Nobel Award for Physiology and Medicine was awarded to British researcher Sir John Gurdon and his Japanese colleague Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent’. Follow live reaction to this news on The Guardian.

This year, the award announcements are being made live via a webcast, which is a far cry from how the 1962 winners received the news, as you can see in this telegram we found on Europeana. Dated 18 October 1962, the telegram is to Francis Crick from Sten Friberg, Rector, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, informing him of the award of the Nobel Prize (1962) in Physiology or Medicine to himself, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins for ‘discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nuclear (sic) acids and its significance for information transfer in living material.’

See this and other Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine items in Europeana.

Europeana’s Nobel Prize Winners Hall of Fame

In today’s gallery of  previous winners you can find in Europeana are:

Sir Martin Evans is professor of Mammalian Genetics at Cardiff University’s School of Biosciences. In 2007 he shared the the Nobel Prize for Medicine with two other scientists on their work on Stem Cell Research. He was the first scientist to identify stem cells and their potential.

Prof. Sir Peter Mansfield FRS, Emeritus Professor of Physics at the University of Nottingham. He won the 2003 Nobel Prize for Medicine jointly with Paul Lauterbur for their seminal discoveries relating to magnetic resonance imaging and its development for use in medicine.

Sir John Sulston is a biologist who shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 2002. He was educated at Cambridge and completed his PhD in nucleotide chemistry. He is best known for his work on C.elegans and his contribution to the work on the human genome project.

Sir Paul Nurse is a cell biologist/geneticist who is best known for his work on the control of the cell cycle in yeast (S. pombe). In 2001 he won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on cell cycle regulation along with Leland Hartwell and Timothy Hunt.

Sir Tim Hunt Credit: Anne-Katrin Purkiss. Wellcome Imagesimages@wellcome.ac.ukhttp://images.wellcome.ac.ukSir Tim Hunt is a British Biochemist. He studied natural sciences at Cambridge before completing his PhD in New York. He now works for Cancer Research UK (CRUK) and his work earnt him the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with Paul Nurse for thier work on cell cycle regulation by cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinases. He is also a fellow of the royal society and was knighted in 2006.PhotographPublished:  - Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons by-nc-nd 2.0 UK

Sir Tim Hunt is a biochemist. He studied natural sciences at Cambridge before completing his PhD in New York. He now works for Cancer Research UK (CRUK) and his work earned him the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with Paul Nurse for their work on cell cycle regulation by cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinases.

Sir James Black is a pharmacologist who (along with George H. Hitchings and Gertrude B. Elion) received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1988 for his development of two important drugs, propranolol (beta-blocker) and cimetidine (histamine H2-receptor antagonist, it blocks production of acid in the stomach and is used for treatment of heartburn).

Sir Henry Dale (1875-1968) started his career working for Henry Wellcome and became one of the most eminent biomedical scientists of the 20th century, awarded the Nobel Prize in 1936.

Images from the Wellcome Library, London, CC-BY-NC-ND or CC-BY-NC.

 

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