Year: 2013

From the Europeana Collections 1914-1918 reception

The memory of the First World War, its events and consequences, its victims and victors, remains very much alive today. It has become part of the individual and collective memory of Europe and of countries across the world – the stories of soldiers and their families continue to be told and published from generation to […]

Read More

Europeana 1914-1918 in France

Thanks to the National Library of France for this blog. Family History Roadshows for Europeana 1914-1918 took place in France from 9-16 November 2013. Thanks to the cooperation between the French National Library (BnF), Archives de France and their network, Europeana and Mission du Centenaire, more than 100 sites all over France participated. Thousands of […]

Read More

Your favourite reads of 2013

Through the magic of modern technology, we’ve discovered the most visited blogs of 2013. So here’s the top ten Europeana blogs you’ve been reading in 2013. It seems you’re a bunch of feline friendly, mermaid-loving First World War enthusiasts! The Europeana blog team would like to thank you all for your reading, liking, commenting and […]

Read More

Virtual reality and the museum of the future

Imagine being able to visit the Louvre, the Rijksmuseum and the Guggenheim all in one day! Imagine looking at the world’s most famous masterpieces from your favourite chair in your own home. Imagine being able to look around museums and visit heritage sites that you otherwise might never be able to see because you can’t […]

Read More

2013: Top 20 Searches on Europeana

So this year is almost over and now we’re ready to ask – what were you all looking for on Europeana this year? Millions of you from the four the corners of the globe visited Europeana.eu in 2013 to search, browse and share over 30 million historical records from over 2,300 of Europe’s memory institutions… but what were the trends of 2013 and what were you all looking for?

Read More

From St Nicholas to Santa Claus

He’s a man of many names – Saint Nicholas, Nikolaos of Myra, Nikolaos the Wonderworker, Nikolaos of Bari, Sinterklaas and of course, Santa Claus. As well as becoming the figure we associate with Christmas gift-giving, St Nicholas is also the patron saint of sailors (being known as ‘Lord of the Sea’ in Greece), merchants, archers, […]

Read More

Double double, toil and trouble: witches and witchcraft

We’ve had Hallowe’en and now the nights are growing ever longer, it’s the perfect time for a spot of witchcraft, some would say. The images from Europeana below show both fictional witches, like the three that Macbeth meets on the heath in Shakespeare’s drama, and ‘real’ witches like Mother Shipton, a woman branded as a […]

Read More

German war cemetery wins Wiki Loves photo contest

We are pleased to announce that this photo of the Cemetery of German soldiers in Tişiţa (a township in the city of Mărăşeşti, Vrancea County, Moldavia, Romania) is the winner of the Wiki Loves Monuments 2013 First World War category. ‘Cimitirul ostașilor germani’, Elena Loredana, CC BY-SA Wiki Loves Monuments is a worldwide volunteer-driven photography […]

Read More

Europeana celebrates 5 years and 30 million objects

This November, Europeana – Europe’s digital library, archive and museum – celebrates two significant milestones – its fifth birthday and the arrival of its 30 millionth cultural object, two years ahead of the 2015 target. Today Europeana brings together the online collections of 2,300 galleries, libraries, museums and archives from across Europe, through both its […]

Read More

Become Wikipedia’s Best Fashion Editor

From 12 November-12 December, Europeana Fashion is hosting the online Europeana Fashion Challenge on Wikipedia. During this month-long challenge, participants are invited to edit articles related to fashion on Wikipedia with a chance of winning some great prizes. Tour of the Nordiska Museet, venue for a Europeana Fashion edit-a-thon earlier this year. Photo Erwin Verbruggen, […]

Read More

Lope de Vega – never short of a drama

Félix Arturo Lope de Vega y Carpio was born 25 November 1562 and died on 27 August 1635. He was a terrifically prolific writer and one of the best dramatists and lyric poets of the Spanish Golden Century of Baroque Literature. His plays are still being performed today. In his time, he penned some 3,000 […]

Read More

Who am I and why am I here?

November 21 is World Philosophy Day* so we’re taking a quick look at what philosophy is all about and introducing you to some of the great philosophers. Getting to grips with exactly what ‘philosophy’ means is about as tricky as some of the questions the discipline itself tries to answer. Philosophy, literally meaning ‘the love […]

Read More

Freedom Monument celebrates Latvia’s independence

Guest blog by the National  Library of Latvia to celebrate Latvia’s Independence  Day on 18 November. People have always honoured their heroes – those who have wrought majestic accomplishments and been involved in great historical events – by building monuments to them. Monumental stones and words of gravitas ensure that powerful thoughts and uplifting accomplishments […]

Read More

Four lives devoted to promoting peace

It’s the International Week of Science and Peace. Yesterday, we posted a blog about some of humankind’s top inventions to cover the ‘Science’ element. So today, we’re looking at ‘Peace’. It is thought that of 3,400 years of written history, there have only been 250 years in which no country has been documented as being […]

Read More

Are these the greatest inventions since sliced bread?

This week is International Week of Science and Peace and so we’ve prepared two blogs for you – today’s is about ‘science’ and tomorrow’s is about ‘peace’. ‘Science’ is a broad term that covers many things, including the development of new ideas, tools and equipments – inventions. So we’ve searched Europeana for some of the […]

Read More

Boy Scouts of Romania on the Eastern Front

At the Europeana 1914-1918 family history roadshow in Bucharest, Romania, we met one family historian, Alin Dimancescu, who has been building up an online archive of his family’s story. We are delighted to say that he decided to share some of that story with Europeana. This image shows a red cross banderol imprinted with stamps from […]

Read More