Japanese artist creates original military artwork inspired by Europeana

We love to hear about how you use Europeana. What inspires you. How the treasures you find motivate you.

portrait_kumikoToday, we hear from Kumiko Sakaki, a Japanese illustrator from Tokyo, who creates original artworks for books and magazines, using items she finds on Europeana Collections.

“I’ve found inspiration in Europeana many times,” says Kumiko. “I love images and objects from the past, and I always think about history when I travel. I gather information from exploring old books and photographs, and from my European friends. But I create original artwork, so I don’t just imitate. Often, Europeana has provided inspiration – when I was researching historical uniforms, for instance, I couldn’t find out everything I wanted to know from reading books alone.”

Kumiko has two distinctive painting styles – one she thinks of as cute, warm and dreamy, and the other more nostalgic yet realistic too. It is this second style that comes through in her artworks drawing on military imagery and artefacts found on Europeana Collections.

Take a look at Kumiko’s work and the items that influenced her and let us know how Europeana inspires you!

Kumiko1

  Left: Artilleristen-Liebe!, Universität Osnabrück, CC-BY-NC-SA

  Right: Lieutnant Alfred by Kumiko Sakaki

Kumiko2

  Left: On a slope of Gisnitz, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, public domain

  Right: Oberjäger Ignaz and Hauptmann Aigner by Kumiko Sakaki

Kumiko3

  Left: Cavalry saber, contribution by Arthur Schuchlenz, CC-BY-SA

  Right: Hauptmann Florian by Kumiko Sakaki

  To see more artworks by Kumiko, visit her website.

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3 thoughts on “Japanese artist creates original military artwork inspired by Europeana

  1. The Japanese artist is basically to congratulate for her creative spirit (any creative impulse means life and future). Nevertheless her fixation on military subjects is a decadent fixation on a dead past. No civilisatory contribution at all. On the other side, I find it culturally false from the part of the Europeana to support this wide distribution of military themes in our times marked by a corruption of civilization by extremely inhuman military events (and their effects on Europe’s society).

    Best greetings
    Prof. Raul Guerreiro

  2. What a talented illustrator…..Thank you for sharing your artistic abilities with those around the world
    thru Europeana.

  3. “Monsieur l’abbé, je déteste ce que vous écrivez, mais je donnerai ma vie pour que vous puissiez continuer à écrire” disait Voltaire à l’abbé Leriche.
    M. Raul Guerreiro où habitez-vous ? dans un pays démocratique et tolérant et dans lequel règne, soi-disant, la liberté d’expression ?
    Le politiquement correct est en train de nous tuer !! Plus besoin de censure puisque nous avons réussi à infiltrer dans la plupart des cerveaux l’autocensure.
    Ne confondez pas, Monsieur, la representation des tenues militaires du passé interprétée par un artiste et les guerres présentes.
    Merci à Europeana de nous offrir une vision artistique non censurée.

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