Europeana

Five of the finest (anti-)heroines from European literature

This post began with an idea to write about great female characters in European literature. Those that break the mould. Doing a little bit of research, the term ‘anti-heroine’ came up. And so did a range of characters who could fall into that category (see below for more on them). So I started to look […]

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A life devoted to art – Olga Boznańska

Olga Boznańska was a notable Polish painter of the turn of the 20th century. In a special guest post, curator Dr Piotr Kopszak of Muzeum Narodowe w Warszawie explores her life and work.

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The story of Monopoly: how Charles stole Lizzie’s idea and made his fortune

‘Hepeating‘ might be a new word, but the concept it represents is tried and tested. Woman comes up with great idea. Man takes it and passes it off as his own. Man receives great acclaim. Woman doesn’t make a fuss. Add in a dinner party ending in a broken friendship, a courtroom revelation, and escaping […]

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Madame de Staël (1766-1817): from the Enlightenment to the Dawn of Romanticism

Writer, republican, literary theoretician and philosopher, Madame de Staël contributed to the diffusion of ideas in Europe through her travels and her Salon, where she received many European intellectuals.

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Marie Jeanette de Lange and the Dutch reform dress movement

This painting from 1900 by Dutch artist Jan Toorop employs a ‘modern’, pointillist technique to depict a genuinely modern woman: Marie Jeanette de Lange.

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Carving a place for women on statues

If you were to count the statues in your local town, village or city, how many would you find that represent women? Despite women making up more than half of the population of Europe, most of the statues you come across commemorate the lives of men.

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What is the real palaeo diet, and who invented bread? Archaeological findings on eating and drinking in the past.

Rotsschilderingen van Minateda, KU Leuven, Belgium, Public Domain Marked Archaeology can give great insight into what processes have made us the humans we are today. Seemingly small things have hugely influenced our contemporary lives, and maybe the most important one is the invention of cooking. Richard Wrangham, professor of biological anthropology, in his book, Catching […]

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#ColorOurCollections – our new colouring book about women in history

It’s this week again when all you need is coloured pencils, crayons and some great openly licensed images to colour in. #ColorOurCollections is back! This year, we prepared a colouring book about women in history. From the first medieval depiction of a female dentist to suffrage posters – there’s a lot to colour and to […]

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