Migration

César Franck: the “Pater Seraphicus” of modern French music

On this International Migrants’ Day, Sofie Taes, musicologist & co-curator of the Europeana Photography Collection for PHOTOCONSORTIUM/KU Leuven, zooms in on the life and work of a brave Belgian who altered the course of French music history.   In the twilight of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871), in which it led significant losses against Germany, France explored […]

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The Harry Orvomaa collection of Jewish recordings

Each month, Europeana Music invites a guest curator to talk about a musical subject and highlight some of the material on Europeana Music. For the month of October, Pekka Gronow presents the Harry Orvomaa collection of Jewish recordings. Now retired, Pekka was one of the founders of the Finnish Institute for Recorded Sound and adjunct […]

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The song legacy of Scottish-Irish Migration

Among the great many cultural connections between Ireland and Scotland, the mutual influence of each nation’s musical and singing traditions on the other is perhaps one of the most interesting. As a case in point, below are some archival examples which point to the legacy of people travelling back and forward between the two countries, […]

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Gustav Mahler and the Vienna Court Opera

The Vienna Court Opera was the carefully planned highlight of Gustav Mahler’s career as a conductor. On the 11th of May, 1897 he debuted initially as a chapelmaster with Richard Wagner’s “Lohengrin” (with Hermann Winkelmann as Lohengrin and Louise Ehrenstein as Elsa). Half a year later, on 8 October, he became the director of the Vienna […]

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Discover rare photos of Edvard Munch

For art lovers across Europe, Edvard Munch (1863-1944) is one of modern art’s greatest painters. He is best known for his work “The Scream”, which is one of the most recognizable works of art worldwide. Munch was born on December 12, 1863, in Löten, Norway, as the second of five children. During his childhood, he […]

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Into the lion’s den with Rubens

The baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens was born on this day in 1577. Known as the ‘Prince of Painters’, and instantly recognisable for his grand, swirling style, his art now hangs in some of the greatest art galleries and most luxurious public buildings around the world. Self-portrait of Peter Paul Rubens. Rijksmuseum, Public Domain. If […]

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Dora Gabe, Bulgarian poet and social activist

Dora and her sister Bela. Varna Public Library, CC0. Today is the 126th birth anniversary of Bulgarian poet, children’s writer and social activist Dora Gabe (26 August 1888 – 16 November 1983). Not much information in English exists about this prolific writer. The child of a Russian immigrant, she was born and raised in Dobrogea, Bulgaria. She wrote […]

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Kapsalon: Barbers and deep-fried snacks

Rotterdam is home to a gorgeous harbour, no-nonsense citizens,  multiculturalism and quirky architecture. What you may not know about this Dutch city is its contribution to the world’s fast-food heritage –  ‘kapsalon’ – meaning barbershop. The dish is believed to have been invented by a barber who asked the Turkish lunchroom across the street to […]

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