Migration

Kapsalon: Barbers and deep-fried snacks

Rotterdam is home to a gorgeous harbour, no-nonsense citizens,  multiculturalism and quirky architecture. What you may not know about this Dutch city is its contribution to the world’s fast-food heritage –  ‘kapsalon’ – meaning barbershop. The dish is believed to have been invented by a barber who asked the Turkish lunchroom across the street to […]

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Remembering Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh died on 29 July 1890, aged 37. Some of his paintings, like his famous sunflowers, chair, starry night, terrace cafe and bedroom, are amongst the most distinctive and recognisable (and certainly the most popular at student poster sales) in the world. But are you familiar with these two? They are both part […]

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Nijinsky: ballet boy

You may have seen yesterday’s Facebook gallery inspired by a ballet dancer and choreographer, Marius Petipa. Today, we continue that theme on the blog with another legendary dancer. As a child, I loved ballet. I had lessons, I had the shoes, I read all the books aimed at young girls who want to dance – […]

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Marie Curie

Marie Curie: An Inspirational Woman for International Women’s Day

Today is International Women’s Day. In order to write today’s blog, a couple of weeks ago, we ran a poll on our Facebook page asking our followers to vote for who they thought were the most influential and inspirational women of history. The poll options, which followers could add to, became a substantial list of […]

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Discover Chopin’s handwritten manuscripts

Frédéric François Chopin, Polish composer and pianist, was born today, 22 February, in 1810. Chopin is considered one of the most significant composers of the Romantic age, although some great pianists have dismissed his work as ‘excessively ornamental and trivial‘.   Chopin was born in a village called Żelazowa Wola, near Warsaw, Poland. He studied […]

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Borromini: rivalry, illusion and tragedy

Greatness, illusion, bitter rivalry, and a tragic end. It’s a life story that could easily have been penned for a Hollywood epic drama. Today we are celebrating Francesco Borromini, born on this day in 1599. Born with the name Francesco Castelli, Borromini was a Swiss Italian architect and a prominent figure in the emergence of […]

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Why is the Sky Blue? – John Tyndall

“The brightest flashes in the world of thought are incomplete until they have been proven to have their counterparts in the world of fact.” – John Tyndall John Tyndall. Photograph by Barraud. Courtesy of The Wellcome Library (CC BY-NC 2.0) Today we are celebrating the birth of one of the most important scientists and educators of […]

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The Science of Movement: Eadweard Muybridge

British photographer Eadweard Muybridge was born on April 9th 1830 in Kingston upon Thames, later emigrating the United States in the 1850s. Muybridge is renowned for his ground-breaking work in animal locomotion, proving a horse does in fact fly when galloping. He was one of the first photographers to use multiple cameras to capture motion, then […]

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