Music

group of people performing music on musical instruments

Adrian Willaert and the foundation of the Venetian School

Composer Adrian Willaert was born around 1490 in the Low Countries, and moved at a young age to Paris to study law at the Sorbonne. There, having met composer Jean Mouton, he decided to devote his life to music.

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hand written manuscript

Adriatic relationships: Carlo Goldoni’s La Dalmatina

The 18th century play La Dalmatina by Carlo Goldoni – sometimes referred to as ‘the Italian Molière’ – is a striking illustration of the relationship between Venice, Istria and Dalmatia.

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painting of man sitting at a piano with

Prelude in Gothenburg, finale in Prague: the Swedish adventure of Bedřich Smetana

While Antonín Dvorák is sometime considered as the greatest composer ever to have lived in the Czech Republic, in the eyes of the Czechs only one man deserves that epithet: Bedřich Smetana.

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group of six men

From the New World: American music from a Czech maestro

Czech composer Antonín Dvořák brought his sensibility and musical genius from his homeland to the United States.

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Josephine Baker – dancer, spy and freedom fighter 

Born into poverty, Josephine Baker reached heights beyond what could have been possible for an African-American woman between the 20s and 60s. She was a polarising force throughout her life as a performer and activist. Seen as a threat to the United States for speaking out against race discrimination, she was loved in France – […]

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Queen of Arts: Christina of Sweden’s Roman reign

Anyone who wanted to see the musical avant-garde at work around 1600 went south of the Alps. With figureheads such as Monteverdi, Peri and Caccini and their work in the new opera genre, Italy pioneered an innovative repertoire and ‘modern’ styles and became the mecca for musicians in the early days of the baroque era. […]

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Austrian Composers in Exile

For the month of June on Europeana Music, Austrian Mediathek takes a look at the lives and works of three composers – Korngold, Weigl and Krenek – who escaped persecution in the 1930s and sought refuge in the United States. In Austria, the year 2018 is an opportunity to re-examine the turning points of 20th-century […]

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Autographs, operas and tubas: Richard Wagner on Europeana

When it comes to the life and works of the influential composer Richard Wagner (1813 – 1883), Europeana, once again, is able to bring together so much interesting material from many cultural institutions across Europe. First of all, there is his music: early recordings of Wagner’s epic four-part Ring cycle, starting with Das Rheingold, then […]

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From Georg Friedrich to George Frideric: Händel’s miraculous migration

In the early 18th century, London was the eldorado for musicians, offering fame and fortune to anyone who had something new or exclusive to boast. Foreign musicians were regarded as exotic, special and prestigious, and therefore very popular both with rich patrons and the general public.

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Percy Grainger: shanties, folksongs and letters to Grieg

This blog tells the story of how digitisation for cultural heritage institutions can bring collections of material back together again, after over a century of separation. These collections concern the Australian-born composer and pianist, Percy Grainger. The first collection comprises the recordings of British folksongs and sea shanties that Percy Grainger made onto wax cylinder […]

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If you have to ask what jazz is…

Art Blakey, drummer and leader of the Jazz Messenger, at the Umeå jazz festival in 1979. Riksantikvarieämbetet, CC BY “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” So spoke the trumpeter Louis Armstrong, when asked to provide a definition. As the subject of jazz straddles the months of January and February in […]

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César Franck: the “Pater Seraphicus” of modern French music

On this International Migrants’ Day, Sofie Taes, musicologist & co-curator of the Europeana Photography Collection for PHOTOCONSORTIUM/KU Leuven, zooms in on the life and work of a brave Belgian who altered the course of French music history.   In the twilight of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871), in which it led significant losses against Germany, France explored […]

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Dive into Europeana to listen to the sea

In December, the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) present music and sound archive collections, picked up from the following centres : Centre de recherche en ethnomusicologie (CREM), the Centre de Recherche sur l’Espace Sonore et l’environnement urbain (CRESSON) and from the phonothèque de la Maison Méditerranéenne des Sciences de l’Homme (MMSH). The CNRS […]

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Music and Mechanics – the exhibition goes live!

We are delighted to announce the launch of the new exhibition, ‘Music and Mechanics’ on Europeana. This has been a fantastic opportunity, not just to look for the different types of musica automata that exist on Europeana, but also to think about the relationships between manually operated or acoustic instruments and the mechanical instruments. Of course, […]

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Les sons de l’Asie et de Madagascar à l’Exposition coloniale internationale de 1931

Chaque mois, Europeana Music est animée par un invité afin de mettre en valeur la grande variété de musique disponible surEuropeana. En ce mois de novembre, la Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) vous présente quelques sons de l’Exposition coloniale internationale de 1931 et vous fait voyager à travers le temps et l’espace à la visite des musiques […]

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The sounds of Asia and Madagascar at the 1931 French colonial Exhibition

Each month, we invite a guest to write about a musical subject and highlight some of the material on Europeana Music. For the month of November, the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF – National Library of France) presents some sounds of the 1931 French colonial exhibition and makes you travel through time and space with music […]

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