Music

Kalimba, Lukembe and Ennanga: the musical instruments of Africa

This month, we take a look at musical instruments of Africa. These are well represented on Europeana Music, thanks to the wide and varied records from Musical Instrument Museums Online (MIMO). This blog gives just a glimpse into some of the different types of instruments that can be found in Africa. Lamellaphones This type of […]

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Access easily sounds from Europeana Sounds Collections!

By navigating through the above feature, you now have an easy and single access point to the material the Europeana Sounds consortium shared with you during the last two years and a half! Whether you are interested in non Western classical music, spoken word performance recordings or sound effect recordings, come and browse to find […]

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Uncovering Ethnomusicology on Europeana Music Collections

The Music Collections of this month is focused on anthropology and its links with sounds and music studies, in France and in the world.

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Viva Verdi! The composer beyond the music

Verdi as a composer, Verdi and the Italian Risorgimento, Verdi as a farmer, Verdi in the movies, Verdi as national icon… How many performers can boast such a wide impact on fields other than the music? His portrait is everywhere: paintings, caricatures, postcards, stamps, dishes, cups, banknotes, …

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Classical composers, music manuscripts and correspondence

Notation can be seen as the foundation of the creative output in classical music. Music autographs, manuscripts and sketches manage to give an insight into the composer’s mind and a glimpse to his way of thinking.

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Voices from the past still echo today

While visiting the various regions of France, one might wonder what he might have heard in those places a century ago.

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The song legacy of Scottish-Irish Migration

Among the great many cultural connections between Ireland and Scotland, the mutual influence of each nation’s musical and singing traditions on the other is perhaps one of the most interesting. As a case in point, below are some archival examples which point to the legacy of people travelling back and forward between the two countries, […]

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We’d music sweet to shake our feet: festivals and fair-days in the Irish music tradition

This is the 2nd blog by the Irish Traditional Music Archive. Previously published is The Cat that Ate the Candle and the Ewe with the Crooked Horn.  See also ‘No bees, no honey; no work, no money’ – an introduction to Scottish work songs by Tobar an Dualchais in Schotland. Irish people are often noted for their friendliness […]

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