Language by design: Jonas Jablonskis, linguist on a mission

Many people, while living away from home, feel that they slowly get less proficient in their mother tongue. Not so for linguist Jonas Jablonskis (1860-1930), who was the first to formulate and outline the basic principles of  the Lithuanian language, while spending a significant part of his academic career and life in emigration. Teaching and […]

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What is the real palaeo diet, and who invented bread? Archaeological findings on eating and drinking in the past.

Rotsschilderingen van Minateda, KU Leuven, Belgium, Public Domain Marked Archaeology can give great insight into what processes have made us the humans we are today. Seemingly small things have hugely influenced our contemporary lives, and maybe the most important one is the invention of cooking. Richard Wrangham, professor of biological anthropology, in his book, Catching […]

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#ColorOurCollections – our new colouring book about women in history

It’s this week again when all you need is coloured pencils, crayons and some great openly licensed images to colour in. #ColorOurCollections is back! This year, we prepared a colouring book about women in history. From the first medieval depiction of a female dentist to suffrage posters – there’s a lot to colour and to […]

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The Watersnoodramp: the Dutch battle against water in moving image

It is 66 years ago to the day that the Netherlands was hit by a big natural disaster, the North Sea flood (“Watersnoodramp”). In the early morning of 1st February 1953, the dykes broke through due to a heavy storm and high tide and water flooded large parts of the South-West provinces. Over 1800 people […]

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Jan Karski – Witness to the Holocaust

It was spring, the last week of April in 1987, when Jan Karski, a then 73-year-old professor of comparative government and theory of communism, entered, as he did regularly for more than 30 years, the lecture hall at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Washington D.C. The room was packed. Karski’s courses in Middle […]

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A Tradition of Mourners – Tomb Sculptures from the Court of Burgundy

In a special guest post to celebrate the Cleveland Museum of Art’s (CMA) new Open Access initiative, Curatorial Assistant in Medieval Art Amanda Mikolic illuminates the tomb sculpture of the Burgundian court, illustrated by openly licensed images from CMA and European institutions.

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From cuddly toys to tea leaves – a child’s view of migration

When you’re a kid, moving house is a big deal. Moving to another country, learning another language, making new friends, facing a new culture… well, that’s a pretty huge deal. During the Europeana Migration campaign, while adults shared stories about their childhood, we also heard stories about children from children, each illustrated by an object that […]

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The Ice Follies: how a Swedish family changed American entertainment history

This photograph shows Frank Otto Skeppstedt, his wife and four children stoically posing for a studio photographer. The formal portrait gives away nothing of their extraordinary family history. At the time this picture was taken, the Skeppstedts (now Shipstads) had settled at St. Paul, Minnesota, after having emigrated from Sweden.

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