books

Europe’s First Printed Book

How do we know what Europe’s first printed book was? Until the 18th century this question was open to speculation.15th-century printed books usually have no title page and do not always give the printer’s name.

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Book Censorship and Banned Books: the Index Librorum Prohibitorum

Did you know that the earliest known list of recommended and banned books dates from about 496? It was issued by Pope Gelasius I. Printed lists of banned books existed since the beginning of the escalating religious conflicts of the 1520s. They were published in the Dutch Catholic regions (1529), in Venice (1543), and in […]

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A is for…anything!

If you’re reading this, I’m pretty sure you know your ABCs. But learning to read isn’t all there is to the alphabet. An ABC can teach you a whole lot more… In Europeana, we have traditional alphabets showing you how to form letters in Gothic style or through embroidery. Then other practical ones, like an […]

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Matilde Serao, Parla una donna: diario femminile di guerra

The memory of the First World War, its events and consequences, its victims and victors, remains very much alive today. It has become part of the individual and collective memory of Europe and of countries across the world – the stories of soldiers and their families continue to be told and published from generation to […]

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Nobel Prizes 2012: Literature

The winners of the 2012 Nobel prizes are being announced this week. So each day, we’re looking to see what Nobel-related content we have in Europeana. Today, we congratulate Mo Yan on winning the 2012 Nobel Prize for Literature. Follow @NobelPrize_org on Twitter for the latest info! However, if you’re wondering who the first winner of the […]

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Celebrating Emily Brontë

Emily Brontë, author of classic novel Wuthering Heights was born on this day in 1818. Portrait of Emily Brontë by her brother, Branwell. Public Domain image. Emily was the third eldest of the four surviving Brontë siblings. Sisters Charlotte, Emily and Anne were all writers. Their first volume of poems was published under the pseudonyms Currer […]

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All for one and one for all!

210 years ago this week (on July 24th 1802 to be exact), Alexandre Dumas, the writer of classic adventure novels The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers was born. Dumas was the grandson of a French nobleman and a Haitian slave, and was born into poverty. Les Mousquetaires, drame d’Alexandre Dumas et Auguste […]

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Saint George’s Day: The Day of the Book

Today is the feast day of Saint George, celebrated in several countries, regions and cities of which he is the patron saint, including: England, Catalonia, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Moscow, Valencia, Majorca, Aragon, Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania, and more. The 23rd of April is traditionally accepted as the date of Saint George’s death in AD 303. In Catalonia, […]

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