Europeana

Isaac Newton

“Nature and Nature’s Laws lay hid in Night: GOD said, Let Newton be! and all was Light.” (Alexander Pope, 1797) Isaac Newton (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727, Gregorian calendar) is considered to be one of the greatest and most influential scientists in history. His immense contribution to science had made him the “gold standard” […]

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Henri Matisse

Today, along with the preparations for the New Year’s Eve festivities, we are celebrating the 142nd birthday of one of the most prominent figures in modern art – Henri Matisse. Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse was born in Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France, on 31 December 1869.  Having studied law and worked in a law office in Paris, Matisse discovered his passion […]

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Stamps

As postcards and letters with season’s greetings as well as packages with Christmas gifts travel across the globe, keeping postal workers especially busy this time of the year, let’s have a look at our selection of postal stamps from around the world:               Explore further the vast collection of stamps on Europeana.

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“Wiki Loves Art Nouveau” Virtual Exhibition

We are excited to announce the launch of our first ever virtual exhibition based on user-generated content. “Wiki Loves Art Nouveau” is an online exhibition made up of 50 images taken by members of Wikimedia Commons, representing some of Europe’s best examples of Art Nouveau architecture. With over 165,000 entries in the Wiki Loves Monuments photo contest, the special […]

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Europeana’s 20 millionth item

This autumn, Europeana’s content reached 20 million items, increasing the content ten-fold since its initial launch in 2008. The 20 millionth item is a painting of the Biblical story of David and Goliath painted by the celebrated Caravaggio in 1600-1601. Caravaggio worked predominantly on Christian themes, linking the sacred and the profane by giving his […]

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Your Winner: WLM Art Nouveau Category

We are pleased to announce the winner of the Art Nouveau category in the Wiki Loves Monuments photography competition! This picture of the interior of the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest by Csaba Attila Kontar is the winning photo, receiving the most votes on Flickr. The photo beat off competition from 343 finalists, all entries were impressive examples […]

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Your votes please!

We are excited to announce that voting is open for the Art Nouveau Category in the Wiki Loves Monuments competition! Wiki Loves Monuments is a photo contest that was organised in over 15 European countries last summer. An impressive number of pictures were uploaded, with over 169,000 entries. Europeana is an official partner and is sponsoring 1 of […]

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End of the First World War – 11 a.m. on 11.11

Today is the 93d anniversary marking the end of the First World War.  Precisely at 11 a.m. on the 11th day of the 11th month of 2011, it will be honoured across the globe with a two-minute silence. Commemorate this event also by checking our newest collection of private memorabilia and stories from the times […]

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Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen

Another scientist in the spotlight today – Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. On 8 November 1895, during his experiment on cathode rays that passed through a glass tube, Professor of Physics in Würzburg, Germany, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen observed a green glow. He realised that the glow was generated by the rays from the tube, capable of passing […]

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Italian Composer Vincenzo Bellini

“I hope to stamp my name on this epoch.” Vincenzo Bellini (1801-1835) And he certainly did! Not only in the 19th century, when Vincenzo Bellini became one of the greatest Italian composers, but also in the 20th century, when his music gained life again through the voices of the incredible sopranos Rosa Ponselle and Maria […]

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Images of Latvia through time

In time for November celebrations of Latvia’s Independence Day, the unique treasures of Latvia revealed in its majestic scenery, ancient castles, beautiful parks and its people, can be now discovered on Europeana. The recently-added collection Lost Latvia from the Latvian National Library opens access to over 18,000 drawings, postcards and photographs from the 19th century […]

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Audiovisual Heritage: See, Hear and Learn

EUscreen, the project that will make Europe’s television heritage available on Europeana, has recently launched its portal. This was timed for the 5th anniversary of the World Day of Audiovisual Heritage celebrated yesterday, 27 October. With the rapid ageing of films, sound recordings and television material, these invaluable resources are frequently lost due to neglect, deterioration […]

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The history of Amsterdam in paintings

Starting as a fishing village along the banks of the river Amstel in the 13th century, Amsterdam soon developed into an important commercial and cultural city in Europe. Its traditional founding dates back to 27 October 1275, when Count Floris of Holland granted inhabitants of Aemstelledamme (translated as “dam on the Amstel”) an exemption from […]

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Art of the First World War

Whether expressed in the bold strokes, the use of colour, or brutal reality of the depicted scenes, the First World War had tremendously shaped art across Europe. Many works of that period reflect the atrocities of war, providing a vivid account of human tragedy. Here are some remarkable examples:

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Europe’s many celebrities

With the recently added collections, you can now explore over 20 million items on Europeana. One of its new collections from Kulturpool gives you a glimpse of Europe’s many renowned celebrities. Just to name a few: Greta Garbo – a Swedish actress who was named the most beautiful woman by the Guinness World Records. Annabella […]

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The ingenious hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha

Did you know that you can find the very first Spanish edition of Don Quixote on Europeana? This book is precious not only for its considerable age, but also because it still holds the printing errors and mistakes that were corrected in later editions. “It was carelessly done – typographic, punctuation and foliation errors abound. […]

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