France

Still from 'Porsche Museum' video, Linked Heritage and architekturclips_network, CCO

Ferdinand Porsche – car engineer of the century

Ferdinand Porsche, the Austrian-German engineer behind the car that bears his name, was born on 3 September 1875. A hard worker even at a young age, he attended technical college at night after helping his father in his mechanical shop during the day. Aged 18, he landed a job with an electrical company and sneaked […]

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Introducing the Royal Engineers Museum

Guest blog by Rebecca Arnott, Assistant Curator – Royal Engineers Museum. Rebecca tells us all about the museum, what they do and why they got involved with Europeana! The Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive houses one of the largest military collections in the UK. As a Corps Museum (‘Corps’ meaning a military organisation), we […]

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The Battle to Cross the Atlantic

Next week, I will be crossing the Atlantic Ocean on my non-stop flight from Amsterdam to Philadelphia. A common occurrence I hear you say, however a little over a 100 years ago, people were literally dying in their attempts to fly this particular stretch of ‘the pond’. Map of the North Atlantic Ocean – 1867. […]

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Marseille, the Capital of Culture and a Giraffe

This weekend, Marseille celebrates its status as a European Capital of Culture. There are parties and events all weekend, so if you’re in the south of France, check out their itinerary! The idea behind the Capital of Culture programme, in which two cities are chosen each year, is to highlight the richness and diversity of […]

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Letters from Indian Soldiers in France, 1916

Letters from Indian Soldiers in France, 1916

The memory of the First World War, its events and consequences, its victims and victors, remains very much alive today. It has become part of the individual and collective memory of Europe and of countries across the world – the stories of soldiers and their families continue to be told and published from generation to […]

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All for one and one for all!

210 years ago this week (on July 24th 1802 to be exact), Alexandre Dumas, the writer of classic adventure novels The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers was born. Dumas was the grandson of a French nobleman and a Haitian slave, and was born into poverty. Les Mousquetaires, drame d’Alexandre Dumas et Auguste […]

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The Forgotten Master: Jean-Honoré Fragonard

Jean-Honoré Fragonard was a French Rococo painter and printmaker, born on April 5th 1732 in Grasse in the south of France. He trained in Paris with Chardin and then later Boucher. Fragonard is considered as one of the all-time masters of French painting, with his unique handling of colour coupled with expressive and confident brush strokes, […]

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The Art of Seduction: Giacomo Casanova

Giacomo Casanova, Venetian adventurer and writer, was born on April 2nd 1725 in the Republic of Venice. During the 18th century for Casanova, as well as other upper class nobles, love and sex tended to be casual and not attached to the serious characteristics of the Romanticism era that followed in the latter part of the 18th […]

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