history

The Book and the Bard

It’s no surprise that if you search for Shakespeare on Europeana, you get back quite a lot of results, in more than 20 languages. Shakespeare wrote, amongst other things, 38 plays and 154 sonnets. He also invented 1,700 words including ‘eyeball’, ‘fashionable’ and ‘lonely’! ‘William Shakespeare: profile.’ Drawing, c. 1793.Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Copyrighted work […]

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Lucrezia Borgia: scandalous or scandalised?

533 years ago this week, a girl was born whose life would prove to be so full of drama and scandal that it has been turned into a play by Victor Hugo, an opera by Donizetti (read the libretto, see the printed sheet music and handwritten music, or listen to a song), a famous painting […]

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Marie Curie

Marie Curie: An Inspirational Woman for International Women’s Day

Today is International Women’s Day. In order to write today’s blog, a couple of weeks ago, we ran a poll on our Facebook page asking our followers to vote for who they thought were the most influential and inspirational women of history. The poll options, which followers could add to, became a substantial list of […]

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Remains of King Richard III of England identified

Today, researchers and academics at the University of Leicester, UK, confirmed that their investigations have led them to believe that a skeleton found under Grey Friars church car park in Leicester is that of King Richard III of England, who died in 1485. The skeleton matches contemporary descriptions of Richard’s build, including spinal deformities, and […]

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Schubert, almond blossom and Bloody Sunday

You might think that there can’t be anything that links Schubert to almond blossom and Bloody Sunday – the day 13 Irish demonstrators were shot dead in Derry. But there is. The thread that holds them all together is today’s date – 31 January. Another link is that you can discover more about all three […]

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Francis Bacon, Shakespeare and Secret Societies

Sir Francis Bacon, first Viscount of St Albans,  was born on 22 January 1561. He is well-known for his contribution to science. In fact, science and research is what it is today because of Bacon. The methodology of science and research, something we may not even think about as having an origin, of ever not […]

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Marseille, the Capital of Culture and a Giraffe

This weekend, Marseille celebrates its status as a European Capital of Culture. There are parties and events all weekend, so if you’re in the south of France, check out their itinerary! The idea behind the Capital of Culture programme, in which two cities are chosen each year, is to highlight the richness and diversity of […]

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Cicero: greatness and a grisly end

January 3rd marks the anniversary of the birth in 106BC of a man called Marcus Tullius Cicero. I have to admit that prior to today, I had only heard the word Cicero mentioned in the context of the song ‘Cell Block Tango’ from the musical Chicago. In the song, though, it refers to the city Cicero, […]

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Remember, remember – but I forgot!

Remember remember the fifth of November, Gunpowder, treason and plot I see no reason why gunpowder, treason Should ever be forgot A well-known rhyme taught to all children, and one I’ve known for many years. So, how did I forget it? Somehow, the fact that my all-time favourite night of the year was imminent slipped […]

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T is for Teacher: World Teachers’ Day

Today, 5 October, is World Teachers’ Day. The day, created by UNESCO in 1994, aims to mobilise support for teachers and to ensure that the needs of future generations will continue to be met by teachers. There are approximately 60 million teachers and 12.5 billion people in education worldwide (according to UNESCO figures). That’s a […]

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EuroPEACEana: What does peace mean to you?

Today, 21 September, is the International Day of Peace. Established by a United Nations resolution, the first event of its kind took place in 1982. ‘Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding.’ – Albert Einstein Peace is a word that means different things to different people. To some it […]

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Napoleon in Cartoons

Today marks the anniversary of the birth of Napoleon Bonaparte. To commemorate this occasion, we’ve searched Europeana for Bonaparte-related content and happened across a number of fascinating cartoons. It’s the political satire of its time, as clever and punchy as the TV panel shows that do the same job today. There’s also a cartoon challenge […]

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Day of the World’s Indigenous People

Today is the United Nations (UN) International Day of the World’s Indigenous People. Indigenous populations are those who are native to a particular place, who practise ‘unique traditions’ and ‘retain social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live.’ (UN) There are around 370 million […]

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A Happy Accident: Fleming’s Penicillin

Ear ache? Sore throat? Tooth ache? If you’re suffering these symptoms, it’s possible you’d benefit from a dose of penicillin. And if that’s the case, you should be raising a glass to Sir Alexander Fleming who discovered the popular antibiotic. He was born on this day, 6 August, in 1881 in the small town of […]

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Read Like Royalty: Precious Manuscript Exhibition

Originally the prized possessions of royalty, 34 of the most significant illuminated manuscripts from the libraries of Carolingian Emperors, French King Charles V and the Aragonese Kings of Naples are now available in stunning detail online. This new virtual exhibition is called Manuscripts and Princes in Medieval and Renaissance Europe. ‘Anthology of travel literature and […]

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Dear Diary… Is there still a place for you?

Image by incurable_hippie, available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License. Today, 6th July, marks the 70th anniversary of Anne Frank’s family going into hiding in their Secret Annex at 263 Prinsengracht, Amsterdam. 13-year-old Anne had been writing her now-famous diary for less than a month. Her work, which has sold over 31 million […]

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