Italy

group of people performing music on musical instruments

Adrian Willaert and the foundation of the Venetian School

Composer Adrian Willaert was born around 1490 in the Low Countries, and moved at a young age to Paris to study law at the Sorbonne. There, having met composer Jean Mouton, he decided to devote his life to music.

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hand written manuscript

Adriatic relationships: Carlo Goldoni’s La Dalmatina

The 18th century play La Dalmatina by Carlo Goldoni – sometimes referred to as ‘the Italian Molière’ – is a striking illustration of the relationship between Venice, Istria and Dalmatia.

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Elsa Schiaparelli: Declaring Feminine Willpower through Fashion

Elsa Schiaparelli is one of the most renowned personalities in fashion history. Not only because she was one of the most striking designers of 1930s Paris, but also because she was a woman who always fought for her plans to become reality, and for her voice to be heard directly through her stunning and unforgettable […]

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Pizza: a slice of migration history

Pizza – possibly one of the most popular, tasty and simple things you can have for dinner tonight. But behind its simplicity lies a much more complex history – this is the tale of the Margherita’s migration.

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crowdheritage, strike a match for education

Three projects #MadewithEuropeana go crowdfunding. Help them grow!

In collaboration with crowdfunding platform Goteo, we recently launched a match funding call that offers 10,000 EUR to support projects using digital cultural content in secondary education. Three innovative projects were selected and started their crowdfunding campaigns on Goteo.org. Their first round will run until 5 June. If the projects meet their minimum financial goal […]

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#5WomenArtists: celebrating female artists from across Europe

Ask someone to name five artists and responses are likely to include famous European names such as Picasso, van Gogh, Monet, da Vinci — all male artists. Ask them to name five women artists, and the question poses more of a challenge. Last year, in honour of Women’s History Month, the National Museum of Women […]

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Viva Verdi! The composer beyond the music

Verdi as a composer, Verdi and the Italian Risorgimento, Verdi as a farmer, Verdi in the movies, Verdi as national icon… How many performers can boast such a wide impact on fields other than the music? His portrait is everywhere: paintings, caricatures, postcards, stamps, dishes, cups, banknotes, …

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Stories and testimonies of Italian soldiers who fought and perished in the Great War

Following the ‘Documenting the Great War‘ blogpost, Istituto Centrale per il Catalogo Unico delle Biblioteche Italiane e per le Informazioni Bibliografiche (ICCU) – Central Institute for the Union Catalogue (ICCU) highlights some of the memories contributed by citizens at the ‘Seminario formativo e raccolta di fotografie, lettere, ricordi della Grande guerra’ community collection day held […]

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Marco Polo – the man who brought China to Europe

Italian explorer Marco Polo was born on 15th September 1254 and died on the 8th or 9th January 1324. We’re not sure which because in Venetian law the day ends at sunset not midnight, so we only know he died more or less on this day 690 years ago. ‘Roma – Dettaglio del ritratto di […]

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Masters of the High Renaissance

Separated by 2,000 kilometres and nearly 250 years, but united by a common birthday (today – 16 July) and a passion for a particular style of painting, today’s blog looks at artists Andrea del Sarto and Joshua Reynolds. Andrea del Sarto (1486-1530) was a figure in the High Renaissance art movement.  He was around at […]

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Lucrezia Borgia: scandalous or scandalised?

533 years ago this week, a girl was born whose life would prove to be so full of drama and scandal that it has been turned into a play by Victor Hugo, an opera by Donizetti (read the libretto, see the printed sheet music and handwritten music, or listen to a song), a famous painting […]

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Matilde Serao, Parla una donna: diario femminile di guerra

The memory of the First World War, its events and consequences, its victims and victors, remains very much alive today. It has become part of the individual and collective memory of Europe and of countries across the world – the stories of soldiers and their families continue to be told and published from generation to […]

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Caravaggio: a Murderous Artist

The personalities featured on the blog this week do nothing to debunk the idea of artists having fiery temperaments. On Tuesday, we told the tale of Baroque architect Francesco Borromini, whose bitter rivalry with fellow artist Bernini is thought to have led to his tragic suicide. Today, we have another dramatic life story and another […]

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Italy: Lorenzo Ornaghi

Arti­cle by Lorenzo Ornaghi, Minister for Cultural Heritage and Activities: The Holy Family (Tondo Doni) Uffizi Gallery Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) Panel painting, diam. cm. 120 (with the frame, cm. 172) Traditionally it is believed that this masterpiece was  commissioned by Agnolo Doni to commemorate his marriage with Maddalena Strozzi in January 1504, and then  painted between […]

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The Art of Seduction: Giacomo Casanova

Giacomo Casanova, Venetian adventurer and writer, was born on April 2nd 1725 in the Republic of Venice. During the 18th century for Casanova, as well as other upper class nobles, love and sex tended to be casual and not attached to the serious characteristics of the Romanticism era that followed in the latter part of the 18th […]

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Maestà in all its beauty

The latest collection from the Kunsthistorische Institut in Florenz includes the renowned work of the Italian painter Simone di Martino – Maestà. Simone di Martino (c. 1284–1344) was the key figure in the development of early Italian painting and the International Gothic style. Very little is known about Simone, but it is believed that he started […]

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