Music

We’d music sweet to shake our feet: festivals and fair-days in the Irish music tradition

This is the 2nd blog by the Irish Traditional Music Archive. Previously published is The Cat that Ate the Candle and the Ewe with the Crooked Horn.  See also ‘No bees, no honey; no work, no money’ – an introduction to Scottish work songs by Tobar an Dualchais in Schotland. Irish people are often noted for their friendliness […]

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‘No bees, no honey; no work, no money’ – an introduction to Scottish work songs

Work songs were commonplace in Scotland for hundreds of years and, whatever the activity, there would be a song to accompany it and match the speed at which it was being undertaken.

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‘Miss Mousie’s Ball’ and ‘The ewe with the crooked horn’: animal-related songs and tunes from the Irish music tradition

This blog post was originally released on the Europeana Sounds blog. After a nice journey through Europeana Sounds items related to goats , let’s continue our series on animals and sounds with some fascinating resources held by the Irish Traditional Music Archive (ITMA).

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Confessions of the last zournas-player in northern Greece

This blog post was first released on the Europeana Sounds website. During the field-research carried out in the prefecture of Evros in 1996 for the “Thrace” programme of the Music Library of Greece, only one zournas-player was located and recorded. His name was Arif Karatza and he was born in Kyani in 1923 and lived […]

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The oldest existing Danish sound records

A collection of wax cylinders on the shelves at Statsbiblioteket is called the Ruben Collection. As a young man Gottfried Moses Ruben started working in his father’s men’s fashion wear shop but that wasn’t young Ruben’s dream job. No – he wanted to see the world. He went first to Portugal. Then three years later […]

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Fighting for new music? Gustav Mahler and the Second Viennese School

Today, the world knows Gustav Mahler primarily as a composer. During his lifetime at the beginning of the 20th century this was all quite different. Mahler in the first place was known as an internationally respected conductor, while his own work as a composer was not much recognized for a long time …

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Gustav Mahler and the Vienna Court Opera

The Vienna Court Opera was the carefully planned highlight of Gustav Mahler’s career as a conductor. On the 11th of May, 1897 he debuted initially as a chapelmaster with Richard Wagner’s “Lohengrin” (with Hermann Winkelmann as Lohengrin and Louise Ehrenstein as Elsa). Half a year later, on 8 October, he became the director of the Vienna […]

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One man’s mass production of opera

Around 170 dramatic secular and 40 dramatic sacred works: this is the number of works that Italian composer Antonio Draghi created over the course of 30 years. He is said to have written around 6 operas per year on average – with a creative peak of 11 operas in 1685 alone. In the two collections of the music […]

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