Music

How does a Greek traditional lullaby sound?

This is a guest post by Marianna Anastasiou, The Music Library of Greece of the Friends of Music Society, CC BY-NC. This post appeared first on September 21, 2015 on Europeana Sounds blog. How does a Greek traditional lullaby sound? How did women used to put babies to sleep in Greece 100 years ago? You […]

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Recording and playing machines through time: a virtual exhibition

Today another guest post by Emilie Vaisman from National Library of France about the latest virtual exhibition created in cooperation with Europeana.  The text first appeared on Europeana Sounds blog on August 31, 2015.  Visit a museum from home and travel back in time to explore a rich history of technical innovations and discover their social and cultural […]

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Field recording Irish traditional music

Today we have a guest post by Maeve Gebruers, Printed Materials Officer at Irish Traditional Music Archive. It was first published on Europeana Sounds blog on August 12, 2015. As well as collecting the contemporary and historic materials of Irish traditional music published by others, the Irish Traditional Music Archive (ITMA) has, for the past twenty-three years, operated […]

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Celebrating World Radio Day 2015

The birth of radio was a groundbreaking invention for both physics and communications, changing the way the world sent and received information forever. Today, the idea of a simple AM/FM radio seems highly outdated. However, in 2012, UNESCO named February 13 as World Radio Day, commemorating the establishment of United Nations Radio on this day […]

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How do you communicate earth’s cultural heritage to aliens?

Imagine a spaceship that is sent on an intergalactic mission. It is unmanned, but there is a little bit of room for an object that represents earth’s shared cultural heritage, in the event that the spaceship is found by an intelligent extra-terrestrial life form. What object would you include? This question is not actually hypothetical. […]

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The Importance of Songs During the War

Whether they had a message or were a simple form of entertainment, songs were a key part of life in society at this the beginning of the 20th century. The songs which would be churned out for popular consumption hailed from a long tradition, stretching back to the Revolution, taking in songwriters such as Béranger and […]

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Turning the spotlight (and your MP3 player!) on to the European audio heritage

By Axelle Bergeret-Cassagne What do a Mozart concerto, the cries of a seagull, a lecture on the international rock scene, the voice recording of the Emperor Kaiser Franz Joseph I in 1915, and the Latvian folk song Pūt, vējiņi (Blow, wind, blow) have in common? These are all part of our European audio heritage. The […]

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Maestro Verdi – most performed composer ever

Guiseppe Verdi (born 200 years ago today – 10 October 1813) was one of the world’s greatest ever composers. His 25 operas, such as Aida and La Traviata, are famed the world over and his works are thought to be the most performed of any composer. ‘Giuseppe Verdi’, French National Library and The European Library, […]

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Introducing the valiha

Guest blog by Tom Miles, Europeana Creative Project Manager at the British Library. Speaking as someone with an interest in all types of music and musical instruments from around the world, the wealth of information that is on Europeana still continues to amaze me. There is a huge potential for all this shared information to […]

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“And we’ll dance a reel or an Irish jig on the good old barn floor”

Today we’re going Irish! To celebrate the Irish Presidency of the European Council, the Digital Agenda Assembly which is taking place this week in Dublin, and the associated Europeana Conference tomorrow at Dublin Castle, we have a guest blog from Grace Toland, Librarian of the Irish Traditional Music Archive (ITMA). 2,000 items from the fantastic […]

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Happy birthday, Tchaikovsky!

Today, we celebrate a great composer’s birthday. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky was born on 7 May 1840, in Votkinsk, Russia. I have always loved Tchaikovsky’s ballet music. I remember dancing around to the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and feeling the romance and tragedy of Swan Lake. I also got hold of a book of sheet […]

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Discover Chopin’s handwritten manuscripts

Frédéric François Chopin, Polish composer and pianist, was born today, 22 February, in 1810. Chopin is considered one of the most significant composers of the Romantic age, although some great pianists have dismissed his work as ‘excessively ornamental and trivial‘.   Chopin was born in a village called Żelazowa Wola, near Warsaw, Poland. He studied […]

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Schubert, almond blossom and Bloody Sunday

You might think that there can’t be anything that links Schubert to almond blossom and Bloody Sunday – the day 13 Irish demonstrators were shot dead in Derry. But there is. The thread that holds them all together is today’s date – 31 January. Another link is that you can discover more about all three […]

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Playlist: Jean-Philippe Rameau

Jean-Philippe Rameau, one of the most important French composers and music theorists of the Baroque era died on this day 248 years ago. Rameau replaced Jean-Baptiste Lully as the dominant composer of French opera and is also considered the leading French composer of his time, alongside François Couperin. Rameau’s music has been described as graceful and […]

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Count Basie and Some Europeana Piano Gems

Today would be the birthday of Count Basie – American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. William ‘Count’ Basie is considered one of the most influential jazz musicians in history. Did you know? Count Basie’s playing was much more relaxed than a lot of other swing piano players. He actually played fewer notes than his […]

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Beatles Day: The Fab Four on Europeana

10th July is Beatles Day, a celebration of the Beatles‘ triumphant return to Liverpool from their 1964 US tour, just in time for the premiere of their film ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ at the Odeon Cinema. This day is considered one of the landmarks in their long and winding road to fame. Since 2008, its […]

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