Month: February 2013

Where would the Oscars be without European literature?

Last night saw the ever glamorous Academy Awards, or Oscars, take place in Hollywood. This year – the awards’ 85th –  saw many nominations for two films derived from  great works of European literature: Les Misérables and Anna Karenina. Les Misérables, which was up for ‘Best Picture’, is based of course on French novelist Victor […]

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Discover Chopin’s handwritten manuscripts

Frédéric François Chopin, Polish composer and pianist, was born today, 22 February, in 1810. Chopin is considered one of the most significant composers of the Romantic age, although some great pianists have dismissed his work as ‘excessively ornamental and trivial‘.   Chopin was born in a village called Żelazowa Wola, near Warsaw, Poland. He studied […]

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New content: over 2 million items added

Last week, we updated the Europeana portal with over two million more items! Europeana gathers content from over 2,200 providers (galleries, libraries, archives, museums and audiovisual collections), via a range of aggregation initiatives and projects. Some bring together content on a regional or national level, others collect content on a particular theme (such as Jewish […]

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Valentine’s Day: love it or hate it?

Love it or hate it, today is Valentine’s Day. Ok, so there’s a lot of commercial nonsense around it, and if you go out for dinner tonight, you’ll probably be disappointed with crowded restaurants, less-than-mouth-watering set menus, and bad service, but that aside, I think it’s rather nice. I like to think of all the […]

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Do you Love Art Nouveau?

Art Nouveau digitisation campaign launches on Valentine’s Day Do you Love Art Nouveau? Will you be in the UK over the next week? If so, you will love a new campaign brought to you by the Collections Trust and being launched, appropriately, on Valentine’s Day. Love Art Nouveau is a crowd-sourced campaign to encourage people […]

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Remains of King Richard III of England identified

Today, researchers and academics at the University of Leicester, UK, confirmed that their investigations have led them to believe that a skeleton found under Grey Friars church car park in Leicester is that of King Richard III of England, who died in 1485. The skeleton matches contemporary descriptions of Richard’s build, including spinal deformities, and […]

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