Month: October 2013

Say Cheese: facial expressions captured by Duchenne

The pictures below aren’t just photos of people pulling funny faces, they are the result of an experiment by one of the Fathers of Neuroscience: Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne. Influenced by the fashionable beliefs of physiognomy in the 19th century, Duchenne wanted to determine how the muscles in the human face produce facial expressions. He believed a person’s […]

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“Memories of the fall of the Berlin Wall – my father’s experiences”

Guest blog from Sophie Naumann, an intern at the German National Library.  Scroll down to read the blog in German. I was born close to the city of Zwickau in a small village in Saxony where my father was the local priest. Although the Berlin Wall came down just three years before I was born, […]

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Youth is life’s flower – Transylvanian soldier’s diaries of life in a Japanese POW camp

Dumitru Nistor, a peasant from the village of Nasaud, was born in 1893. His childhood dream was to travel and see foreign countries, so in 1912, when the time for recruiting came, he asked to be enlisted in the Austro-Hungarian navy, not the Transylvanian militia, where Romanians usually ended up. After graduating from his Navy […]

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Painting the Eiffel Tower

Everywhere needs a bit of a spruce up now and then. At home, that means getting the vacuum out or going outside with a tin of paint and a ladder. Imagine the task though, if the building you’re trying to give a face-lift is the Eiffel Tower in Paris. The pictures below are all public […]

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Hungarian announcements from the First World War

The memory of the First World War, its events and consequences, its victims and victors, remains very much alive today. It has become part of the individual and collective memory of Europe and of countries across the world – the stories of soldiers and their families continue to be told and published from generation to […]

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Maestro Verdi – most performed composer ever

Guiseppe Verdi (born 200 years ago today – 10 October 1813) was one of the world’s greatest ever composers. His 25 operas, such as Aida and La Traviata, are famed the world over and his works are thought to be the most performed of any composer. ‘Giuseppe Verdi’, French National Library and The European Library, […]

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