Music

Access easily sounds from Europeana Sounds Collections!

By navigating through the above feature, you now have an easy and single access point to the material the Europeana Sounds consortium shared with you during the last two years and a half! Whether you are interested in non Western classical music, spoken word performance recordings or sound effect recordings, come and browse to find […]

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Uncovering Ethnomusicology on Europeana Music Collections

The Music Collections of this month is focused on anthropology and its links with sounds and music studies, in France and in the world.

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Viva Verdi! The composer beyond the music

Verdi as a composer, Verdi and the Italian Risorgimento, Verdi as a farmer, Verdi in the movies, Verdi as national icon… How many performers can boast such a wide impact on fields other than the music? His portrait is everywhere: paintings, caricatures, postcards, stamps, dishes, cups, banknotes, …

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Beyond Amadeus – the forgotten operatic legacy of Antonio Salieri

If someone is asked today, which operas of Antonio Salieri he or she knows, most of them will not come up with an answer, which is not surprising. The operas of Salieri had already started vanishing from stage even before the composer’s death in 1825 and are hardly shown today.

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Classical composers, music manuscripts and correspondence

Notation can be seen as the foundation of the creative output in classical music. Music autographs, manuscripts and sketches manage to give an insight into the composer’s mind and a glimpse to his way of thinking.

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Voices from the past still echo today

While visiting the various regions of France, one might wonder what he might have heard in those places a century ago.

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The song legacy of Scottish-Irish Migration

Among the great many cultural connections between Ireland and Scotland, the mutual influence of each nation’s musical and singing traditions on the other is perhaps one of the most interesting. As a case in point, below are some archival examples which point to the legacy of people travelling back and forward between the two countries, […]

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We’d music sweet to shake our feet: festivals and fair-days in the Irish music tradition

This is the 2nd blog by the Irish Traditional Music Archive. Previously published is The Cat that Ate the Candle and the Ewe with the Crooked Horn.  See also ‘No bees, no honey; no work, no money’ – an introduction to Scottish work songs by Tobar an Dualchais in Schotland. Irish people are often noted for their friendliness […]

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‘No bees, no honey; no work, no money’ – an introduction to Scottish work songs

Work songs were commonplace in Scotland for hundreds of years and, whatever the activity, there would be a song to accompany it and match the speed at which it was being undertaken.

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‘Miss Mousie’s Ball’ and ‘The ewe with the crooked horn’: animal-related songs and tunes from the Irish music tradition

This blog post was originally released on the Europeana Sounds blog. After a nice journey through Europeana Sounds items related to goats , let’s continue our series on animals and sounds with some fascinating resources held by the Irish Traditional Music Archive (ITMA).

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Confessions of the last zournas-player in northern Greece

This blog post was first released on the Europeana Sounds website. During the field-research carried out in the prefecture of Evros in 1996 for the “Thrace” programme of the Music Library of Greece, only one zournas-player was located and recorded. His name was Arif Karatza and he was born in Kyani in 1923 and lived […]

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The oldest existing Danish sound records

A collection of wax cylinders on the shelves at Statsbiblioteket is called the Ruben Collection. As a young man Gottfried Moses Ruben started working in his father’s men’s fashion wear shop but that wasn’t young Ruben’s dream job. No – he wanted to see the world. He went first to Portugal. Then three years later […]

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Fighting for new music? Gustav Mahler and the Second Viennese School

Today, the world knows Gustav Mahler primarily as a composer. During his lifetime at the beginning of the 20th century this was all quite different. Mahler in the first place was known as an internationally respected conductor, while his own work as a composer was not much recognized for a long time …

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Gustav Mahler and the Vienna Court Opera

The Vienna Court Opera was the carefully planned highlight of Gustav Mahler’s career as a conductor. On the 11th of May, 1897 he debuted initially as a chapelmaster with Richard Wagner’s “Lohengrin” (with Hermann Winkelmann as Lohengrin and Louise Ehrenstein as Elsa). Half a year later, on 8 October, he became the director of the Vienna […]

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One man’s mass production of opera

Around 170 dramatic secular and 40 dramatic sacred works: this is the number of works that Italian composer Antonio Draghi created over the course of 30 years. He is said to have written around 6 operas per year on average – with a creative peak of 11 operas in 1685 alone. In the two collections of the music […]

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The Latvian “nightingale” Elfrīda Pakule

Historical sound recordings are treasures that, since the end of 19th century, inform us about musical life, about performers and about musical interpretation. We would like to tell you about one of the great 20th century Latvian opera voices, a coloratura soprano, whose recording legacy is a powerful witness to her remarkable voice.

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