Netherlands

Making pancake batter

Small-screen smiles for World Day for Audiovisual Heritage

It’s UNESCO’s World Day for Audiovisual Heritage today, a day to highlight the importance of preserving both sound and video heritage material. So, here are three picks from our biggest audiovisual partner, the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, that exemplify just that, and what’s more, will hopefully bring a smile to your face. Camping at […]

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The Mauritshuis arrives in Europeana

Today we welcome the wonderful collections of the Mauritshuis into Europeana, published in high-resolution and released freely into the public domain for the first time. Portrait of a Woman from Southern Germany, 1520-25. Formerly attributed to Hans Holbein the Younger. Mauritshuis. Public Domain The Mauritshuis is famous for its unique collection of paintings by Dutch and […]

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a cat playing on a desk

Art Up Your Tab now available for Firefox

In April, we announced that Art Up Your Tab was available as an extension for the Chrome internet browser. Now, we’re pleased to say it’s also available for Firefox users. The plug-in displays a full-screen painting or photograph from a frequently refreshed pool of carefully selected images from Europeana for each newly opened tab or window. The […]

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a cat playing on a desk

Art Up Your Tab: heritage in your browser

Art Up Your Tab with curated artworks from the inspiring collection of Europeana! Most people will see just a blank screen when they open a new tab or window in their browser. This could be much more interesting! That’s why Kennisland, Studio Parkers and Sara Kolster have developed a plug-in for the Chrome browser that shows you enticing, […]

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#5WomenArtists: celebrating female artists from across Europe

Ask someone to name five artists and responses are likely to include famous European names such as Picasso, van Gogh, Monet, da Vinci — all male artists. Ask them to name five women artists, and the question poses more of a challenge. Last year, in honour of Women’s History Month, the National Museum of Women […]

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Homes for tiny people: 18 beautiful doll’s houses

As a child in 1980s Britain, several books and TV shows captured my imagination with their little people and tiny houses. Bagpuss. Tottie – the Story of a Doll’s House. And my very favourite, The Borrowers. Imagine being so small, the whole world being so big. I imagined these people existed, under my floorboards, amongst […]

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Contraceptives, buttons and much more

Written by – Ingeborg Verheul, Collection Manager – Library and Archive Atria Since a few years and to a growing extend, objects form an additional source for historical research. Digitisation makes the material easily accessible for research. The objects collection of Atria consists of over 1700 objects that are related with the Dutch and international […]

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Kapsalon: Barbers and deep-fried snacks

Rotterdam is home to a gorgeous harbour, no-nonsense citizens,  multiculturalism and quirky architecture. What you may not know about this Dutch city is its contribution to the world’s fast-food heritage –  ‘kapsalon’ – meaning barbershop. The dish is believed to have been invented by a barber who asked the Turkish lunchroom across the street to […]

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Pieter de Hooch of the Dutch Golden Age

Pieter de Hooch, baptised on this day, 20 December, in 1629, was a Dutch painter, famous principally for his depictions of the domestic life of women and children, and for his use of light. His work is related in theme and style to his contemporaries, the Dutch Golden Age great artists Jan Vermeer and  Nicolaes […]

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Netherlands: Halbe Zijlstra

Article by Halbe Zijlstra, State Secretary of Education, Culture and Science: “Ain’t nothing like the real thing”, is what Marvin Gaye used to sing back in the sixties. And it is this line that instantly came to my mind when I was granted the opportunity to marvel at this ancient masterpiece in person. Nevertheless, the digital copy […]

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Koninginnedag: Queen’s Day in the Netherlands

Today the Dutch celebrate Queen Beatrix. Happy Queen’s Day to the Netherlands! Queen’s Day, or Koninginnedag in Dutch, is a national holiday in the Netherlands, Curacao, Sint Maarten and Aruba. Before Queen’s Day the Dutch celebrated ‘Princess Day’ on August 31st. The first celebration was in 1885, on the fifth anniversary of the then young Princess […]

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Icon of Expression: Vincent van Gogh

“Poetry surrounds us everywhere, but putting it on paper is, alas, not so easy as looking at it.” – Vincent van Gogh Dutch post-impressionist painter, Vincent van Gogh was born on 30th March 1853, in the town of Zundert in the south of the Netherlands. Vincent spent his early adulthood working for a firm of […]

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5 December: Sinterklaas

Here in the Hague, the tension rises (and not just because we have the CCPA Annual General Meeting in Rotterdam tomorrow). According to Dutch tradition, on the evening of December 5,  Sinterklaas is delivering his presents to every child’s home.  Sinterklaas (or more formally Sint Nicolaas ) is a traditional winter holiday figure still celebrated today in  the Netherlands, Belgium and some formerly […]

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Voyage to the Great Unknown Southern Continent

Today we are honouring one of the bravest explorers and sailors in history: Abel Tasman, the Dutch man who was the captain of the first reported European expedition to reach the  island of Tasmania, 40 kilometres south of the Australian continent, on 24 November 1642. During the same voyage he was also the first European to sight […]

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The Art and Life of Johannes Vermeer

It’s hard to believe that for two centuries Johannes Vermeer, whose painting Girl with a pearl earring is among the most famous art works in the world, was barely mentioned in any of the resources on 17th-century Dutch painting. He was rediscovered only in the 19th century, after Gustav Friedrich Waagen and Théophile Thoré-Bürger published […]

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The history of Amsterdam in paintings

Starting as a fishing village along the banks of the river Amstel in the 13th century, Amsterdam soon developed into an important commercial and cultural city in Europe. Its traditional founding dates back to 27 October 1275, when Count Floris of Holland granted inhabitants of Aemstelledamme (translated as “dam on the Amstel”) an exemption from […]

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