Paris

underground tunnel with green lighting

Going underground: the rise of Europe’s metro railways

Underground mass transit eased the pressures of rapid population growth, urban expansion and traffic congestion in major European cities during the first half of the 19th century.

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A story of migration: Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Three Colours White

Each of the films of Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Three Colours trilogy explores a topic from the French Revolution motto Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.

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hand written manuscript

Adriatic relationships: Carlo Goldoni’s La Dalmatina

The 18th century play La Dalmatina by Carlo Goldoni – sometimes referred to as ‘the Italian Molière’ – is a striking illustration of the relationship between Venice, Istria and Dalmatia.

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From Russia with love: Misia Sert, queen of Paris

Misia Sert was one of the most intriguing and influential women in Belle Époque Paris, a muse and confidant to many of the iconic artists and composers of the time.

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The world was her stage: the extraordinary life and times of Unė Baye

From Hollywood glamour to the Siberian gulag, the life of Lithuanian actor Unė Baye was as dramatic in life as it was on the stage Uršulė Babickaitė-Graičiūnienė was born in the Lithuanian village of Laukminiškiai. She began acting and singing whilst in elementary school. In 1913, she moved to Russia, where she studied music, drama […]

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César Franck: the “Pater Seraphicus” of modern French music

On this International Migrants’ Day, Sofie Taes, musicologist & co-curator of the Europeana Photography Collection for PHOTOCONSORTIUM/KU Leuven, zooms in on the life and work of a brave Belgian who altered the course of French music history.   In the twilight of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871), in which it led significant losses against Germany, France explored […]

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The sounds of Asia and Madagascar at the 1931 French colonial Exhibition

Each month, we invite a guest to write about a musical subject and highlight some of the material on Europeana Music. For the month of November, the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF – National Library of France) presents some sounds of the 1931 French colonial exhibition and makes you travel through time and space with music […]

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Marketing modern art at 31 Rue Bonaparte

Nowadays, we’re used to billboards and posters advertising the latest exhibitions on the sides of buses and busy street corners. Art is big business so it’s only natural it’s got a publicity budget to match. In fact, art posters can even become valuable collectables, fetching huge sums at auction houses around the world. All of […]

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Come, write about fashion for Wikipedia

Come, write about fashion for Wikipedia

If you know your Gucci from your Pucci, are proficient in French and are looking to make contacts within the fashion world in Paris, this may just be the event for you. Europeana Fashion is hosting another editathon at Les Arts Décoratifs  in Paris on 22 March 2014. You are invited to come and write […]

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The Battle to Cross the Atlantic

Next week, I will be crossing the Atlantic Ocean on my non-stop flight from Amsterdam to Philadelphia. A common occurrence I hear you say, however a little over a 100 years ago, people were literally dying in their attempts to fly this particular stretch of ‘the pond’. Map of the North Atlantic Ocean – 1867. […]

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Avant-garde Pioneer: Man Ray

Emmanuel Radnitzky was born on this day in 1890. The son of Russian immigrants to the USA, his family soon moved from Philadelphia to Brooklyn, New York. In 1912 Emmanuel, Manny for short, followed his brother’s lead in changing the family-name to Ray. Manny also changed his first name to Man and combined the two […]

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The Forgotten Master: Jean-Honoré Fragonard

Jean-Honoré Fragonard was a French Rococo painter and printmaker, born on April 5th 1732 in Grasse in the south of France. He trained in Paris with Chardin and then later Boucher. Fragonard is considered as one of the all-time masters of French painting, with his unique handling of colour coupled with expressive and confident brush strokes, […]

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The Art of Seduction: Giacomo Casanova

Giacomo Casanova, Venetian adventurer and writer, was born on April 2nd 1725 in the Republic of Venice. During the 18th century for Casanova, as well as other upper class nobles, love and sex tended to be casual and not attached to the serious characteristics of the Romanticism era that followed in the latter part of the 18th […]

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Henri Matisse

Today, along with the preparations for the New Year’s Eve festivities, we are celebrating the 142nd birthday of one of the most prominent figures in modern art – Henri Matisse. Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse was born in Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France, on 31 December 1869.  Having studied law and worked in a law office in Paris, Matisse discovered his passion […]

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Claude Monet – The Creator of Impressionism

“Light is the principal person in the picture” (Claude Monet) The French painter Claude Monet was born on 14 November 1840. His work was so revolutionary and created so much impact that until today it is difficult not to place him as one of the greatest painters of all times. Monet was one of the […]

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Marie Curie

Today we are celebrating the birthday of one of the greatest women in history – Mme Marie Sklodowska Curie, the Polish-French physicist and chemist who shook the scientific world with her achievements in the beginning of the 20th century. “Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood.”  Marie Curie is […]

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