photography

International Winners of Wiki Loves Public Art 2013

Over the past few months, we’ve been charting the progress of the Wiki Loves Public Art photo competition. Now we can announce the winners! The contest took place in Austria, Finland, Israel, Spain and Sweden. All in all, more than 9,250 images were uploaded by 225 entrants, of which 57 percent were first time contributors […]

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Wiki Loves Public Art – check out the entries!

The first Wiki Loves Public Art photo contest has now closed to entrants. We are pleased to say that it succeeded beyond expectations as there were a total of 9,250 photos submitted by 224 contestants in Austria, Finland, Israel, Spain and Sweden. These photos of over 2,155 different artworks are now available on Wikimedia Commons […]

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Cameras at the ready for Wiki competition!

Get your cameras at the ready for a brand-new photography competition! If you live in or are visiting Austria, Finland, Israel, Spain or Sweden this month, take a snap of a piece of public art there and you could win yourself 500 euros in travel certificates. The Wiki Loves Public Art (WLPA) photography contest launched  […]

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Wiki Loves Monuments 2012: Words From The Winner

Wiki Loves Monuments 2012: Words From The Winner

For the last two years, Europeana has sponsored a category in Wiki Loves Monuments – last year it was Art Nouveau architecture, this year it’s GLAM monuments. ‘GLAM’ is short for ‘Galleries, Libraries, Museums and Archives’, so pictures of the buildings and environments related to these kinds of heritage organisations. The competition has now come to an […]

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Cast your Wiki Loves Monuments vote now

Cast your Wiki Loves Monuments vote now

This year’s Wiki Loves Monuments  competition is almost at an end. With more than 350,000 submissions from more then 15,000 people in 33 countries it has been a huge success. The winners of the international photo competition will be announced in early December, but before that you can still vote for the best photo in […]

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T is for Teacher: World Teachers’ Day

Today, 5 October, is World Teachers’ Day. The day, created by UNESCO in 1994, aims to mobilise support for teachers and to ensure that the needs of future generations will continue to be met by teachers. There are approximately 60 million teachers and 12.5 billion people in education worldwide (according to UNESCO figures). That’s a […]

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Avant-garde Pioneer: Man Ray

Emmanuel Radnitzky was born on this day in 1890. The son of Russian immigrants to the USA, his family soon moved from Philadelphia to Brooklyn, New York. In 1912 Emmanuel, Manny for short, followed his brother’s lead in changing the family-name to Ray. Manny also changed his first name to Man and combined the two […]

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Day of the World’s Indigenous People

Today is the United Nations (UN) International Day of the World’s Indigenous People. Indigenous populations are those who are native to a particular place, who practise ‘unique traditions’ and ‘retain social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live.’ (UN) There are around 370 million […]

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Beatles Day: The Fab Four on Europeana

10th July is Beatles Day, a celebration of the Beatles‘ triumphant return to Liverpool from their 1964 US tour, just in time for the premiere of their film ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ at the Odeon Cinema. This day is considered one of the landmarks in their long and winding road to fame. Since 2008, its […]

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The Science of Movement: Eadweard Muybridge

British photographer Eadweard Muybridge was born on April 9th 1830 in Kingston upon Thames, later emigrating the United States in the 1850s. Muybridge is renowned for his ground-breaking work in animal locomotion, proving a horse does in fact fly when galloping. He was one of the first photographers to use multiple cameras to capture motion, then […]

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Nostalgic Viewfinder: Polaroid and the Instant Camera

What is your earliest memory of photography? For most of us it is probably the instant camera. A symbol of the democratisation of photography which started in the mid 20th century and laid the foundations for digital photography today. The earliest instant camera, which consisted of a camera and portable darkroom in a single compartment, was invented in […]

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New archaeological content on Europeana

Over 800,000 records for archaeological monuments and sites are now available on Europeana. The material that ranges from rune stones and tombs to dwellings and archaeological sites is provided by the Swedish National Heritage Board through CARARE, the project that brings archaeological content to Europeana. The records on Europeana are in text format and contain […]

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Iparművészeti Múzeum (1070. számú műemlék)

Your Winner: WLM Art Nouveau Category

We are pleased to announce the winner of the Art Nouveau category in the Wiki Loves Monuments photography competition! This picture of the interior of the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest by Csaba Attila Kontar is the winning photo, receiving the most votes on Flickr. The photo beat off competition from 343 finalists, all entries were impressive examples […]

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Your votes please!

We are excited to announce that voting is open for the Art Nouveau Category in the Wiki Loves Monuments competition! Wiki Loves Monuments is a photo contest that was organised in over 15 European countries last summer. An impressive number of pictures were uploaded, with over 169,000 entries. Europeana is an official partner and is sponsoring 1 of […]

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End of the First World War – 11 a.m. on 11.11

Today is the 93d anniversary marking the end of the First World War.  Precisely at 11 a.m. on the 11th day of the 11th month of 2011, it will be honoured across the globe with a two-minute silence. Commemorate this event also by checking our newest collection of private memorabilia and stories from the times […]

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Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen

Another scientist in the spotlight today – Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. On 8 November 1895, during his experiment on cathode rays that passed through a glass tube, Professor of Physics in Würzburg, Germany, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen observed a green glow. He realised that the glow was generated by the rays from the tube, capable of passing […]

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